About Us

Our Mission

The Windham World Affairs Council (WWAC) is an all-volunteer council and proudly maintains all events free of charge to the public. Our region is rich in knowledgeable people with experience in world affairs. Each month our organization endeavors to bring such people to you as speakers. We seek individuals with diverse perspectives who can shed light on the political, economic, social, and environment problems of our complex world and offer possible solutions. In so doing, our intention is to encourage discourse and dialogue. In the question and answer sessions, which follow all our presentations, we hope that you, the members of our community, get the opportunity to grapple with the ideas presented. Our goal is to help you better understand the issues and problems our world is facing. In this way we hope to contribute to the creation of a livable, peaceful, better world in which we are prepared to participate knowledgeably in public affairs and make informed choices in elections.

The World Affairs Councils of America

The Windham World Affairs Council of Vermont is part of the “World Affairs Councils of America” (WACA), the largest international affairs non-profit organization with 484,000 members and participants. The World Affairs Councils of America is the largest nonpartisan, non-profit grassroots organization in the United States dedicated to educating and engaging the American public on global issues. Over 500,000 people a year benefit from the network programming, including members and participants.

The World Affairs Councils of America has a long and storied history that stretches back some 90 years. Two groups, the Foreign Policy Association (FPA) and the World Affairs Councils worked together in the same organizational system from 1918 until the early 1950s. The FPA was begun in the spring of 1918 by a small group of individuals who worked with President Woodrow Wilson that included journalist and social reformer Paul Kellogg, who also served as FPA’s first president. The founding members were concerned that at the end of World War I, Americans would choose an isolationist foreign policy over one of engagement and worked to nurture grassroots citizen involvement in international affairs. By 1947, these two groups operated as a national organization that was composed of a network of independent community councils.

In 1986, the National Council of World Affairs Organizations national office was established in Washington, D.C. This office evolved into the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA). Today, WACA is the country’s largest non-profit organization dedicated to fostering grassroots understanding and engagement in international affairs and seeks to involve as many citizens as possible in an exchange of ideas, knowledge and understanding of global issues.

The national office of the WACA works to develop new program opportunities to distribute to member councils. This includes a variety of national program series, an annual national conference, five flagship programs, Leadership Missions to other countries, and other opportunities.

In addition to providing program opportunities, the WACA acts as the central hub for the council network, connecting councils with resources, opportunities, and of course, with each other. Councils often turn to the WACA for assistance with capacity building and organizational development. The WACA staff visit several councils every year and work hard to help councils accomplish their goals.
button-2

 

4 Comments

  1. I tried to register for this, but the link did not open.
    Thursday, July 27, 2017 @ 6 pm WWAC and Jerusalem Peacebuilders will jointly sponsor a screening in Brattleboro of “Disturbing the Peace” a new documentary by Stephen Apkon, who will introduce the film Venue: 118 Eliot
    118 Eliot Street, Downtown Brattleboro

    This is a FREE event, but space is limited. To be guaranteed a seat, please register by e-mailing us using the link below and arriving 10 minutes before the beginning of the event
    Register for Event

    • Dear Thomas,
      I am sorry you experienced difficulty registering for the event through the site. I tested the link and it worked for me. Never mind, I went ahead and registered you myself.
      Rosalyn Shaoul for WWAC

  2. Philip Blackburn

    I joined WWAC this a.m. online and have two questions:
    1. I donated $35 which I believe entitles me to a family membership. Pls. confirm.
    2. How do I sign up to attend a talk. In particular, the Oct. 13 event w/Dr. Galbraith.
    Thanks

    • There is no need to sign up to attend talks. The only time we ask for an RSVP is when we include a dinner, as we are doing in our “Understanding Cuba Through Film” series. This is so that we know how much food to prepare.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *