Previous WWAC Events

July 27, 2017
WWAC, Jerusalem Peacebuilders, and 118 Elliot
jointly sponsored a screening of “Disturbing the Peace,” a documentary by Stephen Apkon, who introduced the film.
Following the screening, a dynamic group of Israeli, Palestinian and American youth leaders participating in Brattleboro’s Jerusalem Peacebuilders Interfaith Leadership Institute led small group discussions with the audience, including a large group of Iraqi teenagers in town for a program at the School of International Training (SIT).


June 23, 2017
Amer Latif, Professor of Religion, Marlboro College
“An Islamic Christmas Tree? What Developments in Cognitive Science
Teach Us About Making Peace”
This talk outlined a way of using reason and imagination in forging a rigorous method for making peace at a deep level between apparent religious contradictions, a way of finding harmony and unity that accommodates difference and multiplicity. The talk also discussed how this method for finding common ground appears from the perspective of contemporary cognitive science about the nature of human understanding.


May 12, 2017
Photojournalist Randy H. Goodman
“Reflections on Iran: The Hostage Crisis to the Nuclear Agreement – – through a photojournalists lens”
Photojournalist Randy H. Goodman captured life in the Islamic Republic of Iran during  the hostage crisis and the Iran-Iraq war.  She recently returned to Iran after thirty-three years to photograph at yet another pivotal time in US-Iran relations: the signing of the Iran Nuclear Agreement.  Her portraits and street scenes, from both periods, presented a unique perspective on that country’s past and future, which she shared in her talk and slide show presentation.


From February to April 2017 WWAC and Marlboro College jointly sponsored a series of 6 lectures.
Full descriptions can be found on the Marlboro/WWAC Lecture Series page.


January 3-10
Javed Chaudhri, Board member of the Windham World Affairs Council
3-Part Lecture Series Entitled “Islam and Muslims”
Brown Bag Lunches held in Brattleboro’s  River Garden. The topics were:
The Last Prophet  The faith of Islam, its theology and tenets, its relationship to Judaism and Christianity, and its attitudes towards Muhammad, the prophets of Israel, and Jesus.
The Rise of A New World Order  How a spiritual and social movement morphed into a culture and civilization as it spread across the globe, its evolution both in politics and society.
The Fall and The Renaissance  The rise and fall and the resurgence of Muslim societies in the modern age, how Muslims responded to Western colonialism, imperialism and the Cold War, and the ongoing struggle to reframe the rationales for sustaining traditional values in the Post-Cold War world and Post- Industrial 21st Century.


Nov. 4, 2016
Rai d’Honoré. Ph.D.
“Occitania: The Forgotten Brilliance”
Our speaker was a contemporary troubadour, who not only discussed Occitania’s origins; the influences that shaped it, and the reason for its importance today, but also took us back in time by performing some of its songs!

Occitania (today southern France) had a radically different culture from the rest of twelfth-century Europe and in some ways was more advanced than many contemporary societies. Powerful lords built impregnable castles, yet townspeople governed themselves, and those of lowly birth rose up to fame and fortune. At its foundation was the concept of paratge — a code of ethics that was practiced as well as preached — combined with the troubadour’s theory of Fin’Amor.  So brilliant and sophisticated was this society that the Renaissance might well have begun here had it not been for a dreadful event.


Oct.13, 2016
Professor James Galbraith
“Inequality: What Everyone Needs to Know”
What does “economic inequality” mean? How is it measured? Why should we care? Why did inequality rise in the United States and around the world? What should we do about it? In his latest book, Inequality: What Everyone Needs to Know, Professor Galbraith takes up these questions and more in plain and clear language, bringing to life one of the great economic and political debates of our age. He has compiled the latest economic research on inequality and explains his findings in a way that everyone can understand. His talk was based on this research


From September to December 2016, we held a 4-part series entitled “Understanding Cuba Through Film. Details of this series can be view on our 4-Part Cuban Film Series page.



June 10, 2016
Ambassador Peter W. Galbraith
“The New Map of the Middle East:The Disastrous Centennial of the Disastrous Sykes-Picot Agreement”
In May of 1916 representatives of Great Britain and France secretly reached an accord, known as the Sykes-Picot agreement, dividing the Arab lands that had been under the rule of the Ottoman Empire. One hundred years later, looking at the area divided by this agreement,  Ambassador Galbraith reviewed their current conflicts, focusing on Iraq and Syria and on the Kurdish minorities in these countries.
Read an examination of this historic agreement on its centenary anniversary
Read a proposal for a return to the nation state with shared ethnicity, language, and religion
Compare maps from 1916 and 2016


May 13, 20
Dr. John Hagen
“American Engagement with Niger:
A Case Study on Confronting Violent Extremism in Africa”
As the academic lead for a U.S. State Department initiative that is helping to develop professional military education for the army of Niger, John Hagen was in a good position to analyze the situation in that country. He showed us why Niger offers a valuable case study that the U.S. must consider when engaging with African countries to curb strategic threats on that continent due to the spread of violent extremism in Trans‐Saharan Africa.


April 15, 2016
Therese Seibert, Ph.D.
“Post-Genocide Peacebuilding and Reconciliation in Rwanda”
Dr. Seibert has travelled many times to Rwanda in order to develop courses on Rwanda that she now teaches; she has returned to Rwanda frequently to work with Never Again Rwanda, which sponsors a two-week Peacebuilding Institute each summer for college students such as Keene State student Shannon Cavanaugh,  who joined Dr. Seibert in reviewing the state of peacebuilding and reconciliation in Rwanda.


March 25, 2016
“FRAME BY FRAME”
Special screening of film, followed by Q&A with local Afghan residents
“FRAME BY FRAME” follows four Afghan photojournalists as they navigate an emerging and dangerous media landscape – reframing Afghanistan for the world, and for themselves.


March 18, 2016
Dr. David Adams
“The Culture of Peace”
Based on his experience as an scientific expert on aggression, and his experience working as a director in the United Nations (including responsibility for the United Nations International Year for the Culture of Peace), he proposed a two-pronged approach. He said that first we need to continue developing consciousness that a culture of peace is possible. And second, we need to begin developing an institutional framework for a culture of peace to replace today’s institutions mired in the culture of war. He publishes a monthly bulletin ( http://cpnn-world.org/new/?page_id=805 ) and blog ( http://decade-culture-of-peace.org/blog/ ) on the Internet devoted to the culture of peace.


Feb. 19, 2016
Dr. Paul Morgan, Ph.D.
“The Paris Climate Agreement: Emissions Accomplished?”
Dr. Morgan reflected on the ‘Paris Agreement’ reached at the most recent UN climate change conference (COP21). After reviewing the history of climate change science and prior attempts at international agreements, he shared what he learned while attending COP21 as an official observer, and addressed whether and to what extent the agreement helps put the world on a path that avoids climate catastrophe.


Jan. 22, 2016
Thomas M. White
“The Power of Place: Encountering Auschwitz 70 Years After Liberation”
Thomas M. White is the Coordinator of Educational Outreach for the Cohen Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Keene State College. He based his talk upon his visit to Auschwitz I and II in November 2014 with the Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation (AIPR). White explored how ordinary people committed extraordinary evil.  Weaving together archival images from a project by two Nazi photographers from the  lab/identification service project in Auschwitz with pictures from the 2014 trip, he explored the process of genocide and the “moral universe” the perpetrators created. He explored the deliberate structures created to serve the needs of the SS, architects and businessmen in exploiting and destroying human beings. He also explored the challenges of encountering such a place, making room for mourning, and refusing to normalize the feelings of outrage. Finally he asked, “Where do we go from here?”


Dec. 11, 2015
Hon. Patricia Whalen

“Proving Genocide”
Judge Whalen served on the War Crimes Chamber of Bosnia and Herzegovina in Sarajevo from 2007-2012. In her talk she examined the evidence used to establish and prove the genocide at Srebrenica. After giving a helpful background review of the events leading up to the events in Srebrenica, she focused on the investigation of the crime.
Pioneering Woman Judge in an International Court
Judge Patricia Whalen Teaching at Keene State

About the Court
For information about the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, this UN site is helpful
For additional help putting this topic in context, here is an explanation of the history of the Former Yugoslavia by the BBC
About Genocide
Genocide Against the Yazidis and Others in Iraq
Genocide: Worse Than War | Full-length documentary | PBS


Nov. 6, 2015
Ambassador Carlos Alzugaray
“Cuba and the United States: The Opportunities and Challenges of Normalization”
When presidents Obama and Castro decided in 2014 to re-establish diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Cuba after a half-century of estrangement, there were never any illusions that the path to normalization would be easy. Dr. Alzugaray, writer, professor, and consummate raconteur analyzed the opportunities and challenges of a normalization process complicated by very different values and social and economic models.
Read more about Ambassador Alzugaray


Oct. 23, 1015
Stephen F. Minkin

“The Tragedy and Destruction of the Bangladesh Floodplain”
Background Readings:
Read about Stephen Minkin’s Efforts to organize support for national plan for the eradication of rickets in Bangladesh
Here is an article in the NY Times on the environmental threat to Bangladesh


Sept. 18, 2015
Dr. Geoff Dolman, PhD
Topic: “Can wealthy countries help poor countries and improve regional peace?”
Dr. Dolman reflected on the experience he has gained in the various countries where he has worked, including Oman, Egypt, Iraq, Nigeria, and Afghanistan. In his opinion only permanently-established, long-term projects have a chance to foster the kind of prosperity that can improve regional peace. Short-term projects he was involved in, such as the cultivation of edible oil plants in Egypt, guaranteed rice marketing in Nigeria, and replacement of poppy crops in Afghanistan, had only limited success. More successful were a longer-term project to provide water for desert crops in Oman sponsored by an oil company and various initiatives in education and infrastructure organized by the highly respected NGO Mercy Corps.


Sept. 1, 2015
Professor James Galbraith
The 2nd in the “Hot off the Press” Series
“The Greek Drama: An Inside View”

Learn more about Professor Galbraith’s Views and Activities
Check out his page on The U. of Texas site for a list
Professor Galbraith heads the University of Texas Inequality Project, a research group consisting mainly of Ph.D. students working under his supervision.
Read about his theories on inequality
James K. Galbraith holds the Lloyd M. Bentsen Jr. Chair of Government/Business Relations at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, the University of Texas at Austin. His most recent book, The End of Normal, was published in September, 2014 by Free Press. His previous book, Inequality and Instability, was published in 2012 by Oxford University Press, and his next one, Inequality: What Everyone Needs to Know, will also be published by Oxford.
Like to read more of Professor James Galbraith’s articles on the Greek crisis?
Check out his page on The U. of Texas site for a list
Professor Galbraith heads the University of Texas Inequality Project, a research group consisting mainly of Ph.D. students working under his supervision.
Read about his theories on inequality
 


July 24, 2015
Ambassador Peter Galbraith
The 1st in its new “Hot off the Press” Series
“The Iran Nuclear Agreement:
Why it is good for America and how it may change the Middle East”

Link to Article in The Commons About Event


June 19, 2015
Tom Redden, Professor of History and Politics at Southern Vermont College in Bennington, Vermont
on “A Buddhist View of US Foreign Policy.”


May 8, 2015
Two exchange students from Russia, Maria Kononova and Eduard Ovsejchuk, made presentations about their country


Feb 20, 2015
Dr. Renate Gebauer of Keene State College spoke on “Sustainability in Developing Countries: A Case Study from Nepal


January 14, 2015
Ambassador Donald Gregg spoke on “The Dangers of Demonization of North Korea”


Dec. 12, 2014
Ambassador Peter Galbraith spoke on “Syria, Iraq and the US strategy to combat ISIS”


November 14, 2014
Exchange students from Nigeria, Indonesia, and Pakistan made presentations about their countries.
In addition they prepared recipes from their own country’s cuisine

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *