Events at Zoom Meeting

A Discussion with Nobel Peace Laureate Jody Williams Williams, who grew up in Brattleboro, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1997 for founding and leading the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, an unprecedented cooperative effort that brought governments, United Nations bodies, the International Committee of the Red Cross and more than 1000 NGOs in 90 countries together to pass the Ottawa (Mine Ban)Treaty. A staunch defender of human rights globally, Williams studies modern warfare to promote new understanding about security today. She recently penned a chapter on “Nukes, Land Mines, and Killer Robots” in A World Free From Nuclear… Continue reading

Featuring Dr. Tamara Stenn, Fulbright scholar, development economist, and author Dr. Stenn shared her work studying the culture and markets that support ancient varieties of Royal Quinoa, hand planted by indigenous Bolivian producers for thousands of years. She shared her experience of arriving in Bolivia at the brink of the quinoa crash, and her observations on the faith and communal values that helped the industry survive. Juxtaposing the ideas of Bien Vivir, the Andean way of living well, and the capitalist model of living better, she examined the worldview and tenacity of ancient people in the midst of a competitive… Continue reading

Arthur Magida is the author of “Code Name Madeleine,” the Pulitzer Prize-nominated new biography of Noor Anayat Khan, who served as a secret agent for the British in France during World War Two, organized cells, invigorated the Resistance, and sent messages to London indispensable for D-Day, all while constantly on the run from the Gestapo. He will discuss how we can harness Noor’s strengths and unique qualities for the greater good today. Continue reading

This was an online Zoom panel discussion by five panelists – Willow O’Feral (Haptic Pictures), Aida Oualate (Justice and Dignity for the Women of Sahel), Patricia Pedroza González (Keene State College), Mei-Ling Ellerman (Brandeis University), and an advocate of the Women’s Freedom Center. They dialogued about the intersectionality of gender-based violence (GBV) and answered these key questions: How do patterns of social injustice, marginalization, discrimination and cultural bias shape GBV? How have these dynamics shifted in the context of the pandemic? Continue reading

Featuring Rev. Dr. Scott Couper, minister and teacher of Centre Congregational Church and member of the WWAC Board Scott’s lecture covered Albert Luthuli’s biography, emphasizing the United States and American Congregationalism’s influence on his theology and politics. Luthuli’s biography will be used as a springboard to comment on fundamental ingredients of effective and moral governance: democracy, education, and human rights. The lecture will offer a warning against blind political allegiance to either a political party or to a cult of personality. Instead, a primary accountability to values and principles ought to supersede obeisance to partisan politics and individual fealty. Continue reading

March 11, 2021 marks 10 years since an earthquake and tsunami touched off three nuclear meltdowns and multiple hydrogen explosions at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. Chiho Kaneko and Norma Field, two women with close ties to the Fukushima region, met in this conversation moderated by WWAC board member Lissa Weinmann, a citizen appointee to the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Decommissioning Citizens Advisory Panel. Kaneko and Field shared their perspectives on the accident’s ongoing environmental, social and economic impacts. Continue reading